Day 11 – Thank you guys for everything

Steven Barajas wanders around the SJSU campus // Photo by Mosaic Staff Photographer Hannah Chebeleu

Steven Barajas wanders around the SJSU campus // Photo by Mosaic Staff Photographer Hannah Chebeleu

By Steven ‘Steezy’ Barajas, Mosaic Staff Writer

When I first arrived at San Jose State University for orientation I was a bit intimidated. I thought everyone was extremely serious about journalism, to be honest I had never consider journalism before I came into this program. And to tell the truth, I still don’t. I found out that journalism isn’t the field for me, but I did learn valuable lessons from my mentors here. Karl was a big inspiration to me, the whole staff itself was extremely helpful. I couldn’t have asked for a better class to be a part of and I thank YOU ALL!

Anyways, my first day here I was really quiet I tried to hold back and observe everyone to see how everyone acted and to see if I “fit in”. Everyone was so kind to me and welcoming it was a bit surprising because I thought all the kids would be so serious about their work that they wouldn’t ever want to have fun haha. Well, that night we had a bonding time in the lounge and I got to know everyone a lot better and they got to know me like no one else knows me. I felt really connected to everyone even though it had only been a few hours. Shout out to us.

First day in the new room was a little overwhelming but I didn’t want to complain because I love a challenge. If it’s not hard it’s not fun, that’s a small quote I live by day to day, night by night. A hard challenge is a great reward.

Being a photographer was actually pretty tough, balancing everyone’s assignments and being responsible for that shot needed for their story. If you don’t get that shot, well you’re screwed haha. But I feel that all of us photographers handled everything well, I was surrounded by amazing photographers and I was honored to learn something from all of them. All I could really say is, thank you guys for everything. I’m extremely grateful.

Lastly, one of my most memorable experiences was definitely being able to get a Media pass to the Golden State Warriors game 6 watch party, in which they won the NBA Championship against the Cleveland Cavaliers. Although I’m a LeBron James fan, it was amazing to be able to witness a championship brought back home to the BAY AREA! Now we just have to wait for the San Francisco 49ers to do it this upcoming football season.

So as I close this blog, I say again, thank you everyone. Nothing would be achievable here if not everyone put in the work that they do. Thanks to everyone especially our drivers, Brian, Creo, Mariana, Rob, Karl and everyone else as well! Thanks to all the editors for making sure the writers were on top of every assignment. Thanks to Joe for being our dorm dad and Leslie for being our dorm mom. Thanks to everyone who I haven’t said, you all count just as much! One last big thanks to Mr. Manly Marcos for keeping this program alive! I will miss you all.

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Day 5 – A blue and gold day

Mosaic staff photographer Rachel Lee gets situated in the crowd to photograph the team. // Photo by Robert Salonga

Mosaic staff photographer Rachel Lee gets situated in the crowd to photograph the team. // Photo by Robert Salonga

By Rachel Lee, Mosaic Staff Photographer

Streamers went flying through the air. Confetti sprinkled down like snowflakes. The sky was covered in a medley of blue and gold. I rapidly shot photos and my shutter went about snapping the momentous occasion.

Today, I had the privilege of attending of the Warriors Victory Parade in Oakland along with David, Sara, and Tomas. Although I’m not an avid Warriors fan, it was still incredibly thrilling to be immersed in such enthusiasm and high spirits. We had an early start and I woke up promptly at 5:45am. After rushing through the bustling traffic of cars and cacophony of screams and honking, we made it to the press check in booth. There was a bit of confusion, but we still were able to obtain the necessary credentials to shoot within the press areas. Tomas and I teamed up in the rally portion of the parade with Rob watching along the sidelines. While Tomas conversed with dedicated fans, I snapped photos with my heavy, telephoto lens. The crowd would light up at the sight of photographers and TV crews and I spent a majority of the morning capturing those moments of excitement. As the day went on and the sun began to beat down on us, Tomas, Sara, David, and I scouted out a prime location for capturing photos and viewing the basketball players. Random men gave speeches on a podium for a good half hour before the players were finally introduced. The crowd went wild for each player and I did my best to capture those genuine emotions (my arms were quite sore at that point). The anticipation built up steadily until Stephen Curry took the stage with his two year old daughter, Riley. “Riley’s dad” (as the announcer had put it) seemed to be a modest man and dedicated father. It was surreal. Seeing this man who had starred in countless games on TV right in front of me was almost unbelievable. I only wished I was a bigger Warriors fan and could truly appreciate the celebration.

The trek back home was a bit exhausting. In the car, Sara went on and on about the once in a lifetime experience which I agreed with before dozing off (along with David and Tomas). When I finally settled back in the newsroom, I was exhausted, thirsty, and hungry. I filled up my stomach with a bagel, popcorn, and water and took a nap back in the dorms.

Day 5 – This is legit.

Mosaic staff writer Sara Ashary joins the press pit at the Warriors victory parade. // Photo by David Early, Mosaic Staff Photographer

Mosaic staff writer Sara Ashary joins the press pit at the Warriors victory parade. // Photo by David Early, Mosaic Staff Photographer

By Sara Ashary, Mosaic Staff Writer

So we survived a day in Oakland today. For a somewhat sheltered Bay Area teen, I am oddly very proud of myself because Oakland has the bad reputation. Although, I interviewed locals and they were so proud to be from there!  I walked with our supervisor Brian and the photographer David around the parade and I saw a bunch of famous people not only correlating to the Warriors but also politicians like Nancy Pelosi. Something that shocked me was that when the police came up on the parade, some people booed! Brian and I got to spend a lot of time together and he gave me some great future advice for a journalist, he also bought a lot of water for all of us, I hope he gets reimbursed.

I was super sleepy the whole day so I went to CVS and bought a Red Bull. I AM STILL SO AWAKE. I guess I am learning some life lessons in the Mosaic….like not to drink Red Bull…ever..like ever. Red Bull taste like thin syrup mixed in with some cough medicine. I will never get how people actually drink that stuff.

It was so crowded… holy guacamole! IT IS A WONDERFUL THING I AM NOT CLAUSTROPHOBIC BECAUSE I WOULD NOT HAVE MADE IT DEAR MOTHER GOD!!!! There were 500,000 people there… can you believe that? I can, because I looked back from the press box and there were people as far as I could see. Crowds of bright yellows and blue cheering on and smiling.

After the parade, the three of us managed to get to the Press box and meet up with Robert, Tomas, and Rachel. And in the moment, I was like “Woah, this is legit.” We were super close to the big stars! Like no joke, Steph Curry was like ten feeet away from me! I had to be very professional and take notes while the photographers took some dope pictures! Okay, can I just say… never ask another journalist for their press pass. I really wanted one so I asked some stranger…and yah it was not a good idea. Either way, it was terrific experience. This was definitely worth waking up five in the morning for!

Day 3 – Dub Nation domination

Photo by David Early, Mosaic Staff Photographer.

Two excited fans express their overwhelming happiness in the concluding minutes of the NBA playoffs // Photo by David Early, Mosaic Staff Photographer.

By Tomas Mier, Mosaic Staff Photographer

Yesterday was definitely crazy. Brian drove Esteban, David, Hannah and I up to Oracle Arena around 3:30. Once we got there, the fans were ecstatic, taking a ton of selfies and yelling “WARRIORS” at the top of their lungs. Despite being two hours before the start of the game, fans lined up at the doors ready to immerse themselves in the beauty of 20,000 seats with “authentic fan” posters and the hardwood floors of the court.

Tickets were sold out. But it definitely took all of them to pack the place. Esteban and I grabbed our press passes and pushed our ways into the arena, making our way down to the court where security guards gave us weird look, I mean, we are high school journalists.

The ESPN game coverage began. Every time LeBron James appeared on the jumbotron the area became one with its boos and obscene hand gestures. Once Coach Steve Kerr came on, or any of the Warriors players, the stadium applauded and yelled in joy.

On the court I saw William Bonilla, sports anchor for Univision 14. I went up to him because I wanted to catch an interview with him for my article on the NBA and the Latino community. Surprisingly, he asked me for an interview. I GOT TO APPEAR ON TV! That was awesome. He even gave me his card.

Throughout the game, at every timeout or between quarters, the Warriors staff didn’t fail to entertain with the “Flying W’s,” the dance and cheer squad, and a team of professional youth dancers.

During gameplay, it felt like the stadium was watching the Warriors right there. They were extremely loud, chanting “DEFENSE” when the Cavaliers had the ball and “WAARRIORS” throughout the game’s entirety.

To not make things too long, the Warriors won and the crowd was as excited as ever. After 40 years, the city of Oakland and the Bay Area was able to take their cars and fill the streets with honking horns and the enthusiasm only a sports team can bring.

It was awesome to stand near crazed fans that have followed the team for the longest time. It showed me that love for sports teams can create an amazing bond with strangers.