Day 6 – Relief

All the things that make up a journalist: some plastic, too many notepads and a draft ready for editing. // Photo by Elizabeth Lopez, Mosaic Staff

All the things that make up a journalist: a press pass, too many notepads and a draft ready for editing. // Photo by Elizabeth Lopez, Mosaic Staff

By Elizabeth Lopez, Mosaic Staff

Today we finally got feedback on our stories! I thought my story was going to suck and I would have to fix like 1000 things but I was surprised I just have to fix a few things. I seriously thought I would have to redo everything but seeing the few edits I have to make took a lot of stress off my shoulders. Now I can start on my next story and hopefully be done by Wednesday.

Breakfast was really good today. I tried cookie butter and I fell in love with it. Now that I know how good cookie butter tastes, I will stop eating nutella. After breakfast I tried to fix the edits on my story but honestly I didn’t do much. I emailed a few people and reread my story but I felt so unproductive.

During lunch, I went to Philz Coffee with Shy, Maya, and Sidra. Shy spilled a bit of her coffee on the floor but some of it splattered onto a man’s pants. It was so funny because she walked away from it like nothing happened. Anyway, the coffee I ordered is really good. I don’t remember the name but it’s sweet. YUMMM!!

After being out of the newsroom for an hour I’m ready to fix the edits on my story. I can’t wait to be officially done with this story. Alright, time to work.

Day 5 – Fueling the flame

 

By Mitchell Lai, Mosaic Staff

There’s no better time to write a blog post than one o’clock in the morning – seriously. After going on Joe’s nightlife tour, the experience reminds me of what I have discovered on the very first day – “Everything has a story.” Walking through downtown San Jose, I wouldn’t have given a second thought to any of the establishments that we passed by, but looking at its culture and demography, I began to question why it is that way. Why does this particular club attract a certain group of people? Why this? Why that? Before I knew it, I was questioning every aspect of downtown San Jose. But in a certain light, the “unknown” and the “why” factor of journalism is what fuels the flame. It’s like throwing logs in a campfire: the pre-existing questions gets consumed, and we produce a bright fire of answers, but if we don’t continue asking questions, no new answers will prevail and the old flames will die out by the next morning.

I think it’s important as reporters to keep questioning the world around us. It’s literally our job to interview others, but I think it should go beyond that. A perpetual curiosity should guide the way we live every day. Not only does it allow us to find a “story in everything,” but it allows us to recognize the beauty in the subtleties of our world. I particularly remember a group of Mexican fans outside a hotel during our nightlife tour. The sound of drums pounding, cars honking, singing, chanting, stripes of red, green, and white blending together among the conglomerate mass, yet seen so clearly worn by each individual in the crowd. Yet, it was the ever-present sense of national pride worn on the sleeve of everyone there that stuck out to me. See, I remember this situation so vividly, not because I have a video recording on my cellphone – quite the opposite in fact. By not recording the sensation, I, for the first time, realized the power behind just being in the moment, letting the curiosity and the inherent questioning of the world take over. Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote, “Most people do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and the heart of the child.” I think I found my inner child today.

I don’t know, just food for thought. I have weird thoughts at 1:30 A.M.

Day 5 – Nightlife

Mosaic reporter Lauryn Luescher sneaks a photo during their nightlife tour with Mosaic founder Joe Rodriguez.

Mosaic reporter Lauryn Luescher sneaks a photo during their nightlife tour with Mosaic founder Joe Rodriguez.

By Lauryn Luescher, Mosaic Staff

Today was deadline day and that was pretty stressful but the highlight of my day was Joe’s nightlife tour. This tour really made me wonder more about Joe’s young days because all of the crazy things he was teaching us seemed to have come from personal experience. We stopped at just about every popular bar and club and we stood outside as Joe explained the significance of the place. The tour really taught me how to be observant and how to make connections. Long story short Joe is very knowledgeable about all things involving the nightlife of San Jose. Hopefully we will learn more about Joe’s teenage days in downtown San Jose soon.

Day 5 – Fueling the flame

By Mitchell Lai, Mosaic Staff

There’s no better time to write a blog post than one o’clock in the morning – seriously. After going on Joe’s nightlife tour, the experience reminds me of what I have discovered on the very first day – “Everything has a story.” Walking through downtown San Jose, I wouldn’t have given a second thought to any of the establishments that we passed by, but looking at its culture and demography, I began to question why it is that way. Why does this particular club attract a certain group of people? Why this? Why that? Before I knew it, I was questioning every aspect of downtown San Jose. But in a certain light, the “unknown” and the “why” factor of journalism is what fuels the flame. It’s like throwing logs in a campfire: the pre-existing questions gets consumed, and we produce a bright fire of answers, but if we don’t continue asking questions, no new answers will prevail and the old flames will die out by the next morning.

I think it’s important as reporters to keep questioning the world around us. It’s literally our job to interview others, but I think it should go beyond that. A perpetual curiosity should guide the way we live every day. Not only does it allow us to find a “story in everything,” but it allows us to recognize the beauty in the subtleties of our world. I particularly remember a group of Mexican fans outside a hotel during our nightlife tour. The sound of drums pounding, cars honking, singing, chanting, stripes of red, green, and white blending together among the conglomerate mass, yet seen so clearly worn by each individual in the crowd. Yet, it was the ever-present sense of national pride worn on the sleeve of everyone there that stuck out to me. See, I remember this situation so vividly, not because I have a video recording on my cellphone – quite the opposite in fact. By not recording the sensation, I, for the first time, realized the power behind just being in the moment, letting the curiosity and the inherent questioning of the world take over. Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote, “Most people do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and the heart of the child.” I think I found my inner child today.

I don’t know, just food for thought. I have weird thoughts at 1:30 A.M.

Day 5 – Today

By Skylar De Paul, Mosaic Staff

Today, one of my editors saw us high school kids sitting around our dorm on our phones and decided we needed to go out and see the real world. At 8pm, he told us to grab our jackets for his “nightlife tour of downtown San Jose.”

Today, I visited a gay bar (I didn’t go inside chill out mom) and spoke to the 23 year old manager about the post-Orlando feelings among the gay community. He told us his bar would stay open no matter what, because they’re not afraid of who they are or what they face.

Today, I came across a small parade in honor of the Copa América where people held up their flags and danced with drums and sang in the street while people drove by and honked and sang along.

Today, I talked to a homeless couple on a corner who moved here from Arizona. We asked them why they chose not to take advantage of local shelters, and the wife said the shelters in the area put her and her husband in different wings, but she gets night terrors, and they can’t bear to be separated and would rather live on the streets. She has a masters degree in computer science. She can’t get a job because she’s in her late 60s and no one will hire her. Her husband seemed mentally unstable. Her friend sitting next to her was a Vietnam vet and an ex fireman who lived in a tenement. They were joined with a 20 year old girl named Marci, whose mom was murdered and whose dad goes in and out of prison.

Today, I saw a beautiful woman get cat-called on the street walking out of a nice restaurant. I’m happy for the four years of Spanish that I got, but I really wish I hadn’t understood that.

Today, our group was approached by a man who offered us a book on Christianity and said “always remember John 14.” We walked away, but my friend turned around later and watched him carry out a drug deal from his backpack.

Today, I got back to my dorm at 11pm rather than sitting on my phone. Today, I cried a little more than I expected to. Today, I learned a lot about the world.