Day 1 – Mosaic: what high school journalism isn’t

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Mosaic staff writers get to work on their story ideas in the Spartan Daily newsroom. // Photo by Creo Noveno

By Kaitlyn Wang, Mosaic Staff

If you asked me three years ago, I would never have imagined myself spending two weeks away from home working in the Daily Spartan newsroom with a bunch of extremely intelligent and passionate reporters who just so happened to be my age, well. I’d probably laugh, but in a good way. But sophomore year rolled around and I realized that journalism was in fact a very viable career option for me, someone who loves writing and telling stories.

Mosaic is an opportunity that I know will open doors for me. Journalism for me has been restricted to a very small perimeter: be it Foothill, our community, or the Pleasanton bubble in general. I’m not entirely sure what I was expecting– although certainly it wasn’t these incredibly nice swivel chairs, can I take one home with me?– but I have been pleasantly surprised at every turn.

Perhaps it was the really nice dorm rooms, or the delicious welcome dinner, or even the slightly awkward but in an endearing way name game icebreaker. But I have never made friends faster than I have in these first two days of Mosaic. I think it’s because these students know what it’s like to want to chase and pursue a story, to want to get to know humans for what they are and translate this humanity into words to spread to a wider audience.

And I relate to that. But more than that, Mosaic has already given me a taste of what high school journalism isn’t. By all means, I love what InFlight has given me and will give me, but I will admit that the environment is vastly different to what can be expected of reporters in the “real world.” Here, high schoolers are no longer teenagers that never understand, instead, we are reporters who have a real drive and a real purpose. The first day in the newsroom was spent working on staff bios, story ideas, and getting our assignments, but already I feel far more like a “real world” reporter than I have in my life.

That’s something I can get behind. That’s something I appreciate. And that’s something I will uphold for the duration of my time at Mosaic.

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